Subjects we learn in school are not useful

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Have you ever been so bored in class you spend the whole time on your phone? Ever struggled in a class you thought was stupid? Well, you’re not alone in that. There’s classes that just don’t need to be there.
Some of the subjects we learn aren’t helpful at all — and it’s hurting our future careers.

Of course, there are subjects we may not like that are still needed in the real world. Math classes are still important, and so are Language Arts classes. But think about science classes. If you’re not going to work in a field for it, what do you really need in the real world? Indigo Hollingsworth, a 9th grader, expressed their views, saying, “… It depends. If they aren’t going into that field, why would they need it? If someone is going into journalism, for example, or a writing field in general, they’re never going to need to know AP calculus, or even just [average] calculus.”

And who can argue with that? Especially athletes. Many student athletes are so unsuccessful in school, and some can’t even get the athletic scholarships they need to move on to colleges and charters. According to Rhema Fuller from The University of Memphis in Perks for Players: High School Teachers’ Perceptions of Athletic Privilege, “Because student-athletes must maintain a certain GPA I would not be surprised if certain teachers provide additional opportunities for student-athletes to raise their grade and otherwise help to nudge student grades to a basic acceptance level.“
Of course, why would athletes be failing their important classes if not for the unnecessary classes that have no place in their future? Why is an athlete taking chemistry? Why is an athlete taking geometry or calculus? They take no place in their futures.
If someone wants to go into an athletic field, why are they not spending more time in a health class, learning about how to keep their body healthy? Why are they not in an anatomy class, learning about the way their body works, where things are, and what gets hurt? They need that knowledge, so why are they using that time on something they don’t need?

We need to be able to make decisions about our classes — which ones are useful to us, which ones aren’t, and which ones will drive us further into a happy future.